A Refresher on Unprofessional Conduct in Pennsylvania as it Relates to Convictions for Assault

In preparation for every hearing, I review case law discussing the relevant legal issues.  One such recurrent topic is unprofessional or immoral conduct.  This is the vague Pandora’s box of behavior upon with both license revocation and denial may be based.  What is immoral conduct as it relates to physical fighting and the crime of assault.

One clear case involves a licensed social worker who pleaded guilty to two counts of simple assault, which is a 2nd degree misdemeanor.  The criminal charges arose from the licensee assaulting a former client and the client’s husband. The criminal complaint alleged that counselor had engaged in an affair with the former client and that upon traveling to the former client’s home, she attacked K and T.  The conduct resulted in convictions, for which the Board issued an Immediate Temporary Suspension order (ITS).  This is immoral conduct.  Do not go and assault a former client for anything, let alone braking of a relationship and returning to their spouse.

Another case is Foose v. State Board of Vehicle Manufacturers, Dealers and Salespersons, 135 Pa. Commw. 62, 578 A.2d 1355 (Pa. Cmwlth. 1990), where the Court defines crimes of moral turpitude as “anything done knowingly contrary to justice or good morals.” Foose, 578 A.2d at 1357.  Assault convictions fall within this definition because assaults “are inconsistent with the definition of good moral character [and they] involve a reprehensible state of mind.” “The reprehensible state of mind” at issue with the misdemeanors of which any licensee is convicted “is the knowing or reckless attempt to cause or causing bodily injury to another, or engaging in conduct which constitutes a physical menace intended to put another in fear of serious bodily injury.” A conviction for 1st or 2nd degree assault means you intentionally inflicted bodily injury upon that person.  Your license could be assaulted by the board for such conduct…..don’t let them do it so don’t you do it.

Sometimes a Board will distinguish third-degree misdemeanor simple assault, which involves conduct that may be lacking in a “reprehensible state of mind” that could arise in a situation such as “a fight or flight scuffle by mutual consent.” However, other Boards have been persuaded that intentional appearance at a victim’s home to conduct an assault constitutes a crime of moral turpitude. It is a reasonable interpretation and the appellate courts have concluded such.

In another case involving a teacher and his wife, the governing regulations provided that the only relevant inquiry when questioning whether a crime is one of moral turpitude relates to the particular elements of the crime committed, not to the facts underlying the particular commission of the crime. The regulatory provision at issue, 22 Pa. Code § 237.9(a), provided guidance, defining “moral turpitude” as including “reckless conduct causing bodily injury to another.” Importantly, many professional licensing regulations do not include this specific inclusive language.

Although the definition in the teacher regulations also included “conduct done knowingly contrary to justice, honesty or good morals,” some courts have opined that the term “moral turpitude” as defined in the regulation, as well as the definitions arising in other statutory contexts requires a reprehensible state of mind or mens rea. Thus, it may be an “act of baseness, vileness, or depravity, contrary to the accepted customary rule of right and duty between two human beings.” Such an act requires at least knowledge of private impropriety or the potential for social disruption. Also an act of moral turpitude may consist of intentional, knowing or reckless conduct.  A teacher, hitting his spouse, has been interpreted as depraved conduct warranting licensing revocation or discipline.

In sum, do not assault your partner, your friends, your current or former clients, and especially, strangers.  Call me to discuss your case and any criminal conviction.

 

 

 

 

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