VRP – Letter of Concern – What It Really Means

Licensees call me asking what is the VRP “Letter of Concern.”  “Do I have to do all these things the packet asks me to do?”  Do I have to answer these quesstions. This blog is a refresher of two prior blogs I wrote: VRP Letter of Concern and What is VRP Cooperation.  Let’s go through the first four items the Letter of Concern packet asks of each licensee.

1) Contact Livengrin (or your local) drug and alcohol treatment center for an assessment.

2) Complete the Participation Cooperation Form and Personal Data Sheet;

3) Sign releases;

4) If you successfully complete the VRP evaluation and you do not meet the criteria for a mental and physical valuation, the VRP will close its file but will still notify the Department of State legal divisions of the findings.

1) The PNAP VRP Assessment Process
The assessment is a basic DSM-V, alcohol or drug abuse, questionnaire.  Assessors almost always find criminal interaction (DUI, drug possession, or theft) or work place impact (getting fired) as a basis for a drug abuse diagnosis warranting monitoring.  Workplace positive drug tests for a non-prescription controlled substance also guarantees a drug abuse diagnosis.   VRP “voluntary” participants do not know this.  You think you could get cleared……NOPE.

Once a licensee contacts the PNAP – specified drug and alcohol treatment provider, to be compliant, the expectation is to disclose current and historical drug and alcohol (D/A) use.  Drug rehab assessors (not medical trained professionals) require VRP “voluntary” participants to release their medical records for review.  The assessors use the records in their PNAP “report” to identify whether the licensee is truthful during an assessment.   Now PNAP has your medical and prescription drug use history.

Some assessors may look past minor recreational use of marijuana or alcohol.  However, PNAP and PHMP supervisors sometimes intervene and “reorganize” assessor’s non-impaired conclusions.  By “reorganize” I mean PNAP caseworkers will either require the assessor to change their no-monitoring conclusion or require a second PNAP assessment.  This is the problem being voluntarily compliant with VRP assessments.  You can’t trust the person performing the assessment.  You can’t trust the PNAP or PHMP caseworker to not intervene in the assessment.  Do not disclose your medical care or medication history in an environment lacking in trust or transparency.

2) Complete the Participation Cooperation Form and Personal Data Sheet
PNAP treats the Participation Cooperation Form as a voluntary enrollment contract. Right off the bat, PNAP attempts to enforce this contract as if it were the Nursing Board. It is not.  For example, prior to or during the assessment process (waiting for scheduling, attending the assessment, or receipt of the report – which is always delayed due to receipt of medical records), PNAP may instruct VRP participants to not work.  PNAP participation is voluntary and voluntary means compliance.  PNAP initially tests a licensee’s ability to comply by precluding work.  This is not proper.  Only a formal Board order precluding a licensee from practicing their profession impairs a license and their ability to work.  If you need to work, and PNAP will not let you, consider not going into the VRP.
Absent a formal Board Order PNAP and PHNP do not have any authority to compel licensees to comply with the VRP participation requirements.  PHMP sometimes requires VRP enrollees to participate in an aftercare plan based upon the PHMP approved assessment.  Or, only after attendance in the care plan can the licensee return to work.   This is wrong.  Months could go by without working, expenses are rising, and licensees need to work.
The VRP letter of concern states “failure to comply with the terms of the PHMP agreement will result in the initiation of formal disciplinary process against the license to practice.” PNAP and the PHMP cannot compel disciplinary action. PHMP and PNAP threats for failure to honor the terms of the PHMP participation agreement – compelling disciplinary action – absent a formal nursing board agreement is an empty threat.  Only a Pennsylvania licensing board prosecutor can initiate disciplinary action. The PHMP and PNAP case workers cannot and do not initiate legal action.
PHMP and PNAP do not have the authority to initiate disciplinary action.  Only after a Pennsylvania professional licensing board enters a formal board order accepting a consent agreement – which is different from a PHMP agreement– can disciplinary action be initiated for breach of that order.  Licensees are allowed to work this entire time.  There is no Board order or other restriction on a licensee’s license during this time.  This is part of the PNAP trap.
PNAP’s Participation Cooperation Form language is a threat scaring licensees to not change their mind.  Licensees perceive the VRP assessment process will be quick.  PNAP makes sure it is not.  After signing the Participation Form, PNAP stops returning phone calls, answering questions, and SLOWS DOWN the process, causing licensees great frustration. Assessments are cancelled or reschedule for weeks.  Licensees who are fully compliant, attend the assessments, provide medical records are treated improperly.
PNAP caseworkers start the bait and switch lie tactics. PNAP caseworkers claim licensees can’t back out of the agreement, must comply and not work during the delay in report clearance or they’ll be subject to disciplinary process. PNAP case workers claim PHMP must release the licensee back to work.  PHMP caseworkers claim it is the legal department or the report is not done yet, or another drug test is required. This is not correct. Absent a formal Board Order, a VRP voluntary compliance participant who can change their mind. The threat of “legal review and prosecution” is just that;  A threat – not reality.
3) Personal Data Sheet
Many licensees initially participate in the VRP as a result of receiving a Letter of Concern.  The Letter of Concern is triggered by criminal charges – a single offense DUI,  a public drunkenness – or falling asleep in a job after working too many hours.  The personal data sheet seeks very private and confidential information.   Filling out a personal data sheet provides PNAP and the PHMP very extensive, confidential, and private information.   Many licensees candidly and honestly answer the personal data sheet questions.
Some questions, however, should not be answered.   Questions 22, 23, and 24(a)-(g) are of specific concern.  When confronted with substance abuse questions 22–24, many licensees indicate they do not have a drug or alcohol use condition, have never been diagnosed with such, and are taking prescription medication.  For the one/off DUI case, minor personal recreational use of pot or some mild alcohol use, the addiction questions can not be affirmatively answered.
At first blush licensees seeking to be compliant with the VRP process do not answer these questions because they can not admit to an addiction and/or do not suffer from one.  PNAP or PHMP case workers review the data sheet answers and claim the licensee did not provide proper complete information.  The delay process begins.  PNAP does not accept blank or denials to these addiction questions.  PNAP tells licensees that their version of the truth makes them ineligible for the VRP and the matter can be referred to the prosecutor for review.    SCARE SCARE SCARE.
Licensee don’t want to be eligible for this program. Licensees should not lie on this form and admit an addiction to get into the VRP.  Admissions of addiction form the basis for VRP  participation and eventual professional licensing boards’ consent agreement compelling compliance in the program.  Admission of an addiction, impairment, and inability to practice nursing is a necessary finding of any Board Order. It also stops the licensee from working.
Do not admit possessing a medical condition (drug or alcohol addiction) you do not have.  Make the Board prosecutor prove their case….. Do not admit any addiction.  The answers to questions 22 through 24 give the PHMP and the Board prosecutors the foundation for the consent agreement.  Don’t answer these questions if you are not impaired, do not suffer from an addiction, and have not been diagnosed as suffering from an addiction.
4) Personal Date Sheet Questions about Drug, Alcohol, or Mental Health Care
Questions 25-33 of the Personal Date Sheet focus on drug or alcohol treatment or mental health care. This is private, confidential medical care received based a medical condition for which many licensees receive appropriate care.  The VRP, PNAP, and the PHMP will utilize your own health care needs against the licensee as a reason to determine an impairment exists.  This is even though the care is for a diagnosed medical condition, for which licensees receive proper care,  and treat with lawful dispensed prescriptions.  Do not give PNAP any personal information about you, about your medical condition, about the medications you take. They’re only using it against you.
Please call to discuss your case

 

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PNAP Case workers — Do Not Trust Them

Medical professionals or their employers call PNAP case workers and intake administrators for numerous reasons.  The initial complaint call against the licensee  generates the “Letter of Concern.”  It is the response call from the licensee to PHMP/PNAP/SARPH/PAP that starts the proverbial ball rolling.  Here are several important facts each licensee should be aware of before calling PNAP.

PNAP/PAP/PHMP caseworkers are told to not tell inquiring licensees the truth. PNAP and PHMP caseworkers are instructed to emphasize the worst possible legal and licensing consequences if there is no cooperation.  PNAP/PHMP caseworkers are instructed to intimidate and scare licensees into the program. PNAP caseworkers are instructed to tell licensees about the costs of the Mental and Physical Evaluation and court fees.  PNAP caseworkers are instructed provide the minimum legal information possible.

PNAP caseworkers do not know the law.  PNAP/PHMP/PAP case workers are not trained in the several health care boards’ regulations.  PHMP/PNAP/PAP case workers do not understand the legal implications of the wrong advice they give. PNAP case workers do not know how to tell the truth.  Some PNAP caseworkers may be in the program too.

 

For every medical professional, agreeing to the initial PNAP assessment is the worst thing you can do. Current conflicts between the DSM-IV and DSM V alcohol use disorder – mild, moderate, or severe – are creating significant issues in determinations of impairment for PNAP assessors.  I have learned that the PNAP assessors could be  calling the PNAP caseworker and managers, who help the assessor diagnosis an impairment. This is improper.

PNAP and PHMP assessments should be performed independently, by appropriately trained medical professionals. PNAP and PHMP supervisors (Simpson and Knipe) should not be consulted on diagnosis. This type of diagnosis cooperation smacks of a pre-ordained determination of an impairment to insure medical professionals go in the program.  Please understand the above is not an anecdote or a hypothetical scenario. I have been told about PNAP supervisors providing supplemental questions and facts to assessors to insure a determination of impairment and a conclusion that the monitoring program is required.  Ethically, any assessor/PNAP consultation is improper.

This tells me that the system of initial communication with PNAP (in which they lie to you) and the read assessment process renders this entire program unacceptable. Be careful.  Call me.

Disciplinary Action – Scope of Practice Certified Registered Nurse Practitioners

Certified Registered Nurse Practitioners (“CRNP”) can prescribe medication, examine patients, diagnose illnesses, and provide treatment, much like physicians do. In fact, nurse practitioners have what’s referred to as “full practice authority” in 20 states, meaning that they do not have to work under the supervision of a doctor. In the Pennsylvania, however, while CRNPs still have more authority than RNs, they must have a medical doctor sign on certain patient care decisions.

Nurse practitioners are increasingly becoming integral to medical teams as more and more hospitals and healthcare facilities are utilizing their expertise. Their experience as working nurses gives them a unique approach to patient care, while their advanced studies qualify them to take on additional duties that are usually left to physicians.

There are many different ways CRNP are exposed to practicing outside the scope of their practice.  Dispensing medications incorrectly or without a prescription is the first and foremost.  CRNPs are especially vulnerable to disciplinary action as they hold prescriptive authority to dispense Schedule II and other non-scheduled medications.  This blog will address CRNP’s legal duties.

CRNP’s must collaborate with a physician who holds a current license to practice in the Commonwealth.  When acting in collaboration with a physician in a “collaborative agreement” within the CRNP‘s specialty, the CRNP may perform comprehensive assessments of patients and establish medical diagnosis, perform and supervise diagnostic tests, institute referrals, develop treatment plans, establish prescriptive authority approvals for pharmaceutical treatments, complete admission and discharge summary’s, and order various supplemental therapeutic medical care. Supplemental medical care includes dietary plans, home health care and hospice, durable medical equipment, physical therapy and dietitian referrals, respiratory and occupational therapy referrals, and perform initial assessments of methadone treatment evaluations.

Methadone treatment and evaluations can be accomplished in conjunction with approval of a physician in the Pennsylvania methadone treatment regulations.  In this time of opioid crisis, CRNP’s prescribing methadone is a huge issue. CRNPs have sought clarification of their authority and qualifications to prescribe Suboxone.  63 PS § 21.283(c) of the Pennsylvania Code sets forth CRNP’s prescriptive authority.

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Every two years CRNP must complete 16 hours of board approved CE credits in pharmacology.  Initially, CRNPs require 45 hours of coursework specific to advanced pharmacology through the a professional nurse education program within five years before initial prescriptive authority approval. Board prescribing and dispensing schedule II restrictions include only 30-day supply authorizations and only in conjunction with a collaborative agreement setting forth such authorization by the physician in the agreement.

CRNP are limited to prescribing 90-day supplies of schedule III and IV controlled substances, which physician based authority is identified in the collaborative agreement. CRNP may not delegate prescriptive authority to other RNs working in the practice. CRNPs may not issue pre-signed prescriptions, must receive a national provider identifier number, and all prescriptions must include the CRNP’s name, title, and Pennsylvania CRNP certification number.  All labeling, packaging, dispensing, administering, and prescribing must be done in compliance with all other federal and state regulations and Pennsylvania Department of Health chapter 28 code of regulations.

CRNPs must register with the DEA and follow DEA minimum standards when prescribing, administering or dispensing controlled substances.  DEA federal regulations require the CRNP to properly conduct and documents their initial evaluation, physical examination, receipt and review the patient’s medical and medication history.  The physical evaluation includes examining the heart, lungs, vital signs, pain level, and body functions that relate to the patient specific complaint. Re-evaluation‘s and follow up should follow accordingly.

Patient counseling and medical records review are warranted to properly document symptoms observed and reported, diagnosis of any condition for which the controlled substance is being given, and the directions for administration. If the CRNP continues to prescribe the controlled substance, medical records must reflect changes to symptoms observed and reported and modification, alteration, or a limitation of any diagnosis of the condition for which the controlled substance is being given and the directions given to the patient.

The CRNP may dispense emergency, short-term prescriptions in conjunction with examination, evaluation, and proper diagnosis if such is then documented in the patient’s medical record.  Any emergency prescription must be delivered to the pharmacist within three days, and the emergency prescription may not be refilled or issued consecutive to an emergency prescription unless there is a follow-up physical examination.

Compliance with the terms and conditions of CRNP prescriptive authority is not necessarily compliance with Nursing Board scope of practice or standards that are acceptable and the prevailing practice.  Compliance with the above PA Code minimum standards does not restrict Nursing Board disciplinary action CRNPs based upon violations of the Drug Act or any other nursing licensing regulation.

Federal and State Drug Act issues address improper prescription dispensing, improper charting, failing to chart, or performing medical malpractice in the course of acting outside the scope as a CRNP.   Mere compliance with PA Code rudimentary medical practice and charting responsibilities and basic medical care giving duties does not shield the CRNPs from scope of practice and other claims.

CRNP scope of practice is governed by the collaborative agreement by and between the supervising physician and CRNP along with any large scale institutional employment job position limitations. Improperly administering medications earlier than the time set forth in a prescription and refilling daily, weekly, or 30 day prescriptions will well necessary trigger employment or board based disciplinary issues.

This is why the prescriptive authority established in the collaborative agreement between a physician and a CRNP  must satisfy very specific requirements. The collaborative agreements must be in writing, identifying the category of drugs this specific CRNP is allowed to prescribe as per their certified practice.   The collaborating physician obviously must sign the agreement and a copy must be submitted to the Bureau Professional and Occupational Affairs.

The agreement must be updated every two years, or whenever the agreement is changed, and must identify the professional liability insurance limits the physician’s policy provides.  Anytime the prescriptive authority in the collaborative agreement is updated or terminated, the CRNP (and no one else) shall notify the Board in writing of such changes. The CRNP is allowed to advertise or publicly display sign identifying their participation in a medical practice. A licensed CRNP may include such nomenclature after their name on any letterhead, business cards, and practice advertising.

CRNP must undertake and only engage in their specific practice area and only perform procedures in which they have necessary knowledge, preparation, experience and competency to properly execute.  CRNP practice is limited in scope to only their specialty and consistent with their CRNP collaborative agreement. This is the scope of practice provision that allows for the allegation CRNP prescribing medication drugs or other items outside the scope of their practice.

Certification as a CRNP may be suspended, revoked, or otherwise subjected to remedial measures when, after notice of and an opportunity for a hearing, the board finds that a CRNP has engaged and performed medical functions and tasks beyond the scope of practice permitted for a CRNP, that CRNP specially, or in violation of the collaborative agreement.  This is the general, catchall provision, for a potential penalty, based upon the allegation that a CRNP performed a medical function for which the CRNP does not have the necessary knowledge, preparation, experience and competency to perform properly or is not qualified under the CRNP Act.

Call me to discuss your case.

Felony Convictions and License Reinstatement

A licensed professional convicted of a felony drug offense is a major impediment to securing licensure in another jurisdiction or seeking reinstatement once your professional license is disciplined for that conviction. In many license reinstatement cases, applicants are so in need of their license that they hire the wrong attorney, waste money on filing reinstatement petitions prior to the expiration of the license preclusion period, or simply give up on getting their license back.
In a 2017 Pennsylvania Nursing Board Final Adjudication and Order the nurse was convicted in 2006 in Delaware of practicing with an expired nursing license.  In 2015 she sought reinstatement of her Pennsylvania nursing license.  Because she was convicted of a felony involving the practice or professional in Delaware, the convicted offense and license discipline was applicable under the Pennsylvania Nursing Act to her Pennsylvania license.
After 8 years, she hired the wrong attorney to seek reinstatement of her Pennsylvania nursing license. Her attorney thought reinstatement was was possible based upon mitigation and rehabilitation evidence.  She was wrong.
Pennsylvania’s Professional Nursing Law, section 6(c), states that the “Board may not issue a license or [graduate training certificate] to an applicant who has been convicted or a felony relating to a controlled substance law (in any jurisdiction) unless at least 10 years has elapsed from the date of conviction.   It does not matter how much rehabilitation the applicant has undergone.  If the application for licensure is not outside the ten years, there is no legal ability for the Board to consider the license application.
This denial of licensure application case reveals that counsel for the applicant did not know the law.  Focusing on rehabilitation rather than eligibility, the applicant’s attorney wasted his client’s money on his premature application, hearing, and appeal time.
Licensing attorneys must know what evidence is admissible in the relaxed administrative hearing process under GRAPP (General Rules of Administrative Practice and Procedure) 2 PA.C.S. § 504.  Knowing to what exhibits or evidence to object and facts an attorney should stipulate will make or break a licensee’s case.  The uninformed general practitioner will not know the importance or admissibility of certain evidence.  They will waste time and legal fee money fighting evidence that is admissible in evidence for the Board to consider or will move into evidence evidence that the Board should not consider.
More importantly, the uninformed practitioner will accept a case simply to pay their bills.  The uniformed attorney will take cases that have no merit, can not be won, or will lose a case that is easily won.  Desperate licensed professionals who are waiting out a discipline and seek reinstatement will pay an attorney who sounds good but can not discern the attorney’s lack of knowledge of their case.
Call me for confidence in understanding your case.  I will give you a clear understanding of the problem, counsel you about the risks and rewards of fighting your case.  I will not take your case, or fight for your license if you do not want me to, can not afford it, or there is no basis to seek reinstatement.
Fighting a disciplinary action – an Order to Show Cause -, contesting the VRP or DMU letters must be done with competent informed counsel. Never concede an impairment. Never admit an addiction without formal legal counseling on the affect of such on your license. Never plead guilty to any criminal offense without consultation with an experienced license attorney so you understand the collateral consequences of the criminal conviction, ARD, or no contest plea.  Please read my blogs and website to understand how I can help you and protect your license.

Medical Marijuana and the Pitfalls for the Professional

The pitfalls of medical marijuana for the professional are more evident every day. Several weeks ago I wrote a blog on the challenges facing licensees who seek a medical marijuana card due to a medical condition. Prescription Drug History   In another blog I wrote about the complexities facing medical professionals who seek to become medical marijuana authorized prescribers.

 

In Pot Doc Article the Philadelphia Inquirer reveals Pennsylvania’s Medical Board, Health Department, FBI, and DEA investigatory practices in this field.  If you are a medical professional, please read this article.  I represented a peripheral, part time doctor moon lighting for Dr. Nikparavarfard.

Doctors working in a medical practice that includes a “Pot Doc“ – doctors that are authorized to write prescriptions for medical marijuana – are subjecting themselves to unnecessary oversight and inquiry.  When a  “Pot Doc” exposes himself to both criminal and licensing  investigations, they expose all nurses or doctors employed by that practice.  Drug Act violations are routinely found and criminal charges filed!.

The FBI and DEA’s investigation of Dr. Nikparvarfard’s Scranton office – the Pot Doc – necessarily also included  my client’s prescribing patterns.  An invasive, long running investigation turned to her simply because the police were investigating that practice and needed leverage against Dr. Nikparvarfard.  Experienced and accomplished undercover FBI, DEA, Health Department agents then ensnared my client.  Again, only because they were looking at Dr. Nik’s practice.

My client was not the prescribing “Pot Doc.”  However, the overarching Pot Doc investigation expanded to any potential criminal activity discovered within the medical practice.  But for my client working for the Pot doc and his medical practice, my client would not have been under surveillance. Unfortunately she was.

Once my client became known to FBI, her prescription and Medicaid/Medicare billing patterns were easily examined, patients contacted, and medical procedures evaluated.  Undercover patients were sent to the practice.  All because of the attention brought on the practice by Pot Doc Nikparvarfard.

One bad apple spoils the pie; two or three bad apples subject professionals to jail.  These types of investigations render medical professionals (nurses and doctors) unemployed and potentially unemployable.  Thereafter, professionals are the target of multiple investigations by medical boards, DEA,  Health Departments, and potentially the U.S. Department of justice.  But for my client’s employment with a Pot Doc, she would not have come under any surveillance.

This case is but one example of many to come.  Overarching public safety concerns, opiates in the news, and an aggressive enforcement environment of a new regulatory scheme create huge risks for both Pot Docs and those doctors and nurses who work with them.

Please call me to discuss

Riding the Bridges of South Jersey And Valley Forge

My administrative law blog followers are eagerly awaiting a new blog. The summer months have been slow with regard to new legal decisions or laws and/or regulations that substantially change my practice.

The various health related professional board’s summer meetings have kept me very busy.  After a licensing board meeting, clients’ matters that are on the agendas – accepting the decision of a hearing officer, approving an consent agreement, or ordering a Mental and Physical Evaluation – generate a lot of work.

Great weather affords me the opportunity to ride my bike a little bit more.  Averaging 125 miles a week takes me across many bridges, rivers, and bike trails, while traversing local county roads. My escapade to the Lancaster County Courthouse via West Chester and the Brandywine Valley was well documented.

Down the Shore, calm winds and little rain allows me to ride throughout the Garden State Parkway’s mainland beach communities. Leaving Margate, Atlantic County, I ride through Somers Point, along the Great Egg Harbor River up to Mays Landing. Turning left on Route 50 (The Pine Barrens Byway), I have had the pleasure of being joined or joining other riders into Cape May County.  We ride to Marmora, or across to Milmay, Estell Manor,  Tuckahoe, Corbin City, Ocean City, and back through Longport New Jersey.

The pictures reveal the geographic flatness of these rides. The hills are man-made and provide a reasonable perch through which one can take in mother nature’s wonders. The artificial elevations are gentle, well paved, and are really fun way to end the ride.

The South Jersey Pine Lands provide a wonderful misty fog, with a crispy pine flavor, in the early morning cool air. This differs from the Schuylkill River Trail, the new pedestrian bridge at Route 422, and riding through Valley Forge Park at sunrise.  It’s a hard choice as to which is a better ride; 50 to 60 miles of flats in just over two hours, or 25 miles of hills and the history of the Valley Forge and Brandywine valley in the same amount of time.

The one constant in all of these rides are the bridges. Large or small, tall or short, long or brief, they allow walkers and riders to go from one place to another without which the rides could not take place. It’s just great to be out there, getting energized and ready for each day.
 Call me to discuss you licensing matter.

Northampton County’s 1861 Court Room!!

Finding the diamond in the rough. That describes my recent drive to the Northampton County Courthouse. As my law practice takes me from the Philadelphia’s suburban counties to northeastern Pennsylvania, I routinely travel on the Pennsylvania Turnpike and its Northeast extension.
The drive this July week was rough. The weather forecast proved accurate; rain and fog through the Lehigh Valley. It was raining so hard, I missed my exit off Rt 476E at Rt 22 E. I drove an additional 20 miles each direction, turning around in Jim Thorpe. (I love the Carbon County Courthouse – see my other blogs – but I was not going there today.)
 I was uncharacteristically late, arriving at 9:25 am for a 9:00 am hearing.  I was otherwise safe.  The judge was extremely gracious and polite. The case was handled quickly.  Opposing counsel – a local assistant district attorney – offered a tour of the courthouse as I expressed my appreciation for our hearing taking place in the old courthouse, courtroom 3, as compared to the new 2004 building.
The county website states, “The original court house was built in  1764. Nearly a century later and after the courthouse had experienced a number of historical events, which included being used as a barracks by Revolutionary troops, a group of citizens petitioned for a new County Courthouse at a different location. On August 23, 1860, the County Commissioners decided to accept land offered at a price of $1.00 that was located several blocks west of the original facility.   A new brick structure was later built on a steep hill at a cost of $53,000. The first term of court was held in the new facility on June 18, 1861.  Since then, two additional wings were constructed to accommodate the growth of Northampton County and satisfy the judicial needs of the expanded population.  The second part of the courthouse was built in 1978 and the third in 2004. “
I was interested in the 1861 building and court room 1.  Finished at the out set of the Civil War.   Wow!! A majestic legal theater, refurbished in 1978 to match the import to the community when the courthouse was built. Original woodwork, plaster, and paint are renewed. County Commissioners rightfully chose to not clutter the court room with of a phalanx of computer cables, microphones, and other modern day accoutrements that clutter some other county courtrooms in which I practice.
The pictures below reveal the courtroom’s grand entrance, judicial bench, and the jury box of the times. The remarkable woodwork and attention to detail immediately reveals itself. The artisans of Pennsylvania’s counties knew their work would be on display at every important and public event of the times. The honor and respect they earned working for their local government on the most important building in the county.

Try to Recognize when an Attorney is Needed

When is it important to hire an attorney in a licensing and criminal defense case? When case agent first contacts you!  Do not talk to them.  Just say thank you, I will call you back; can we meet next week; no you can not come into my house!!
Every day licensing board investigators, police detectives, human resource departments, or other government investigators reach out to targets or “individuals of interest” in a wide range of potential investigations. These law enforcement officers (most state investigators are retired police detectives) are trained to secure statements from the subject of the investigation.  They call you, show up at your house, or try to meet with you at work.  This is when you know you need a lawyer.

My blogs generate phone calls from potential clients.  A recent theme of these calls sticks out;  investigators are employing consistent, heightened and aggressive investigative techniques to surreptitiously secure statements and admissions of criminal conduct, unprofessional licensing behavior, or illegal behavior.  This is explained in one sentence; why do an investigation when an admission from the target will solve the case.

Targets give statements for one reason: ignorance and naïve understanding of the law.   Targets  or potential criminal defendants give statements because they think they are obligated to cooperate, should cooperate, or that cooperating is in their best interest.  These reasons are incorrect.
Admitting to engaging in questionable or criminal conduct eliminates investigator’s obligation and duty of proving their case through means other than an admission by the target.  Admissions to detectives and investigators eliminates their need to perform basic investigator police work.  It satisfies  the police officer’s burden of proof in securing evidence of illegal or criminal conduct against you.
Licensees who admit to a Board investigator to practicing outside the scope of their license, stealing from their clients, overcharging for services, or any other offense does the investigator’s job.  In many cases, before the statement is secured, there is only a mere suspicion of inappropriate behavior.  There is no specific evidence of a criminal act. The statement itself becomes the evidence against you. The person giving the statement creates the criminal evidence for the investigator that they did not otherwise have.   (I feel the same way  about licensees who cooperate in the PHMP VRP assessments.  Do not give the Board’s any evidence they do not have.)
Once a criminal admission is given, the police officers don’t do anymore work. The state investigators don’t do anymore work. This is why there is no legal obligation to cooperate.
Giving statements to employers in work place investigations has the same ultimate result. I have written about this many times. Choosing to not give a blood test, write a personal statement, or even provide copies of medical records cannot be held against you. You can be fired, but it can’t be held against you. At times it’s more important to choose to remain silent then to keep your job.  Anything you say in the employment setting is merely turned over to the board investigator or police.
Remaining silent and not cooperating with any investigation  — not disclosing truly damaging information — sometimes is the best defense of your license or against criminal charges.  Do not succumb to the police officer bullying. Suggestions by police that they can secure search or arrest warrants should not persuade you to give up your constitutional rights.
You do not have to give a statement. You do not have to give a DNA test. You do not have to participate in any polygraph evaluation.   If the officer does not believe your word or accept your version of events, agreeing to provide objective forensic evidence will not change their mind. You will just be giving them evidence to accumulate and use against you at a later date.
Hopefully you have the opportunity to read this blog before you have spoken to an investigator about a licensing issue, participated in the workplace related investigation, or cooperated with any police inquiry inquiry about your job or your behavior. If not, call me as soon as possible.
Whether you hire me or any other lawyer, stop stop cooperating with any police investigation.

Road Riding in the Counties

My personal and business travel is taking me to more counties throughout the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania than ever before. The local courthouse houses in the county seats are really interesting for me. The court houses — arenas of legal combat — are throw backs to more glorious days when the local big trial was the event of the year.
In the past I took for granted these architectural gems that are spread throughout the various townships and boroughs within which I practice.   Now, I seek out and explore the courthouses. Whether by car or bike, I am having fun.
This spring I bought myself a road bike. I ride ferociously around the eastern part of Pennsylvania. I have the pleasure of routinely riding through Philadelphia,  Conshohocken, Norristown, and Valley Forge Park. All are within 5-15 miles of my house.  Sometimes I ride from my house to Philadelphia and back.
A recent Saturday took me on a further ride — from West Chester to the City of Lancaster. The road ride began in West Chester and ended in Lancaster County, behind the Court House. We departed West Chester through its southern rolling-hills of Brandywine Township. We followed Brandywine Creek through East Bradford Township, Downingtown  to West Fallowfield Township. One word — marvelous.
After 90 minutes the group ride, with me at the back of the pack, entered Lancaster County. I was greeted by signs for farm fresh brown eggs, personally constructed homes, garages, sheds, and wonderful antique tractors.
Tractors, tractors, tractors. But not your ordinary tractors.  These were green, yellow and red tractors, pulled by horses. The drawn mowing tractors were hard at work, gas free, mowing lawns and fields. Some tractors were too tired to work, gathering rust. There was no worry about rubber tires rotting. Metal wheels needed no repairs.
The morning aromas changed with each turn in the road. Pungent cow, horse, pig dung awoke my sinuses.  Crushed wild blackberries and dripping vines of honeysuckles permeated homesteads. The morning dew clung to grass blades and tree branches through the Brandywine Creek bike route. Entering Lancaster and riding down Duke Street brought with it fresh bakery smells and the Lancaster County brewing Company.
In each county seat, I look for a small coffee shop. Lancaster’s Prince Street Café did not disappoint. The fresh cappuccino after a 50 mile ride awakened all of my exhausted senses. Orange juice and fresh eggs on a croissant made me even happier. The pictures below reflects the quaintness of the café and the wonderful effort the bakers and barista’s gave the Saturday morning breakfast crowd.
An unexpected joy came as I began to get ready for my drive home. Just to the west of the Prince Street Café is the Lancaster County Donuts Shop. Homemade donuts and holes are sold with every conceivable topping — as if I was in an ice cream shop — tantalized my taste buds. The sublime chocolate with vanilla cream cheese frosting carried me through the rest of my day.
I could not have been happier. Content and satisfied by a hard work out, great ride with new friends and a bulging stomach.  Blair and Clearfield counties also did not disappoint. I’ll keep you posted.

A Fringe Benefit of Practicing Law in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania

There are many benefits to being a licensed, practicing lawyer in this country and Commonwealth.  One fringe benefit (and I mean fringe) of practicing law in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania is driving through and to the counties in this jurisdiction.  Practicing in Delaware, Chester, York, Lebanon, Dauphin, Luzerne, Montgomery, Lackawanna, Berks, Bucks, Carbon, Lancaster, Northampton, Monroe, Clearfield, Blair, Center counties, I drive throughout the Commonwealth.  The word Commonwealth does not do justice to the beauty of the counties in which I travel and the courthouse in which I practice.

Monroe County Court House Square

 

One recent cool, spring day I had the pleasure of a relaxing drive from my home in the suburbs of Philadelphia to the Monroe County Courthouse in the quaint hamlet of Strousburg, Pa.  I left my home at 7:00 am.  By 7:45 I entered the Lehigh Valley and was approaching the scenic Delaware River Water Gap area.  I left Philadelphia in a heavy fog, arriving in the Lehigh Valley as the fog began dissipating from the  mountain valleys.   Steamy slopes and long shadows were cast as the sun climbed over the hills and heated the morning sky.  Route 78’s mountain passes were freed from their foggy blanket revealing the height of the tree-topped slops.  What a peaceful ride.  The rich majesty of Penn’s Woods (the translation of the word Pennsylvania) became evident.

The coffee shop on the square at the Monroe County Court House, Strousburg, Pa

Home made scones, croissants, and danish.

Upon arriving in Monroe county and the courthouse square, I had the pleasure of stopping for coffee at the café duet. Pictured above, I partook in a croissant and perfect cappuccino in the a sun-lit square.  I could have been in any hamlet or borough in another country.  I, however had the pleasure of attending to my profession, take care of a valued client, and being given the opportunity to enjoy Monroe County.

In between mentally organizing my case, I day dreamed about the incredible mountain bike riding trails that snaked through the various gorges, streams, and mountain passes. Exercising both my mind and body is a wonderful activity I engage in on a daily basis.  I will be in Center, Blair, and Clearfield counties over the next several weeks.  I will cherish my time and my profession while I enjoy the best the Commonwealth has to offer this summer.

Call me about your legal matter.

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