Serious Medical Conditions according to Pennsylvania’s Medical Marijuana Law and How They Relate to Medical Professionals

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Pennsylvania began the legalization of medical marijuana with specific limitations on the medical conditions for which a practitioner can issue a prescription for medical marijuana (“MM”).   Act 16 of 2016, Section 403 (a) – Conditions for issuance – allows a physician to certify medical necessity only if all of the following requirements are met:

(1)  The practitioner has been approved by the department for inclusion in the registry and has a valid, unexpired, unrevoked, unsuspended Pennsylvania license to practice medicine at the time of the issuance of the certification.

(2)  The practitioner has determined that the patient has a serious medical condition and has included the condition in the patient’s health care record.

(3)  The patient is under the practitioner’s continuing care for the serious medical condition.

(4)  In the practitioner’s professional opinion and review of past treatments, the practitioner determines the patient is likely to receive therapeutic or palliative benefit from the use of medical marijuana.

The regulations define Serious medical condition as:

 (i) Cancer.
 (ii) Positive status for Human Immunodeficiency Virus or Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome.
 (iii) Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.
 (iv) Parkinson’s disease.
 (v) Multiple sclerosis.
 (vi) Damage to the nervous tissue of the spinal cord with objective neurological indication of intractable spasticity.
 (vii) Epilepsy.
 (viii) Inflammatory bowel disease.
 (ix) Neuropathies.
 (x) Huntington’s disease.
 (xi) Crohn’s disease.
 (xii) Post-traumatic stress disorder.
 (xiii) Intractable seizures.
 (xiv) Glaucoma.
 (xv) Sickle cell anemia.
 (xvi) Severe chronic or intractable pain of neuropathic origin or severe chronic or intractable pain in which conventional therapeutic intervention and opiate therapy is contraindicated or ineffective.
 (xvii) Autism.

For the medical licensee seeking a medical marijuana card, the significance of these medical conditions cannot be understated.  A Pennsylvania medical licensee (nurse, doctor, dentist, and all others)  will have to suffer from a serious medical condition.  A referring medical marijuana practitioner  will have to certify the professional licensee’s serious medical condition necessitates marijuana for therapeutic or treatment reasons.  The practitioner will have to perform a completed and full assessment of the patient’s medical history and current medical condition, including an in-person consultation with the patient.  Reviewing the prescription drug monitoring history of that patient/licensee will also be necessary.

A MM practitioner will have to credibly determine that imminent disability is present, warranting therapeutic medical marijuana as all other drugs have or are failing.   Well, if the medical professional is disabled, they can not do their job.  If they are high on medical pot, the Boards think these licensees probably should not be permitted to practice their profession.

The burden of proof in disciplinary cases involving drugs or alcohol is whether the licensee suffers “from a drug or alcohol addiction or impairment or a medical condition that renders them incapable safely practicing.”  If a medical licensee’s MM practitioner suggests to the Department of Health the licensee is medically disabled to a degree that requires the therapeutic use of medical marijuana, a medical record has been generated stating the licensee is almost medical disability from practicing their profession. The medical impairment burden, it could be argued, has been met.

Conversely, if the medical licensee is prescribed medical marijuana (but not disabled), the use of medical grade marijuana renders the licensee under the influence of drugs or alcohol to such an extent that renders them in capable of safely practicing.  This logical reasoning jump  — using marijuana automatically renders one unsafe the practice — is found in other provisions of Pennsylvania law.  Those include the Drug act and Pennsylvania’s DUI statute.

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Pennsylvania’s DUI statute, 75 Pa. C.S.A. §3802(d) provides for legal intoxication if the mere presence of marijuana is in one’s bloodstream.  (Pennsylvania is not a drug recognition state where the prosecutor has to put into evidence testimony from a drug recognition expert, a “DRE”, that the level of marijuana in somebody’s blood renders them under the influence and incapable of safely driving.)  Pennsylvania is a per se violation state.  This means that the legislature has determined as a matter of policy, that any marijuana or other schedule II prescription medication in a person’s blood, renders that person automatically incapable of safely driving.

It is not a hard legal argument to suggest that if you can not safely drive because you are high on pot (any amount), the medical professional can not perform their medical  duties because they are high on pot.  Here is where the confidentiality provisions of the Act are important.   Section 301(A)(4) of the Act establishes an electronic database to include activities and information relating to medical marijuana organizations, certifications and identification cards issued, practitioner registration and electronic tracking of all medical marijuana as required under the Act.

Section 301(B)(a) allows for confidentiality of Patient information.–The department shall maintain a confidential list of patients and caregivers to whom it has issued identification cards. All information obtained by the department relating to patients, caregivers and other applicants shall be confidential and not subject to public disclosure, including disclosure under the act of February 14, 2008 (P.L.6, No.3), known as the Right-to-Know Law, including:

(1)  Individual identifying information about patients and caregivers.
(2)  Certifications issued by practitioners.
(3)  Information on identification cards.
(4)  Information provided by the Pennsylvania State Police under section 502(b).
(5)  Information relating to the patient’s serious medical condition.

My concern is that these provisions in conjunction with other Pennsylvania rules and regulations will be employed against the medical professional who seeks and secures a medical marijuana card.  Your doctor must provide this information to the Department of Health.  If pot is found in a medical licensee’s blood, getting the medical records from their doctor (who will be discovered through the data base) is very easy.  Or, the licensee will be compelled to identify and provide their MM practitioner and his records at a Board ordered evaluation.

My experience in Pennsylvania’s heightened enforcement environment strengthens my conviction on this point. Currently every single DUI, workplace positive drug test, or other minor legal infraction is generating Board ordered mental and physical evaluations. The Boards are getting ready for a waive of intoxicated professionals.  They are gravely concerned for the well being of the Commonwealth’s citizens.  The Boards figure, get any current licensee help, stripped of their license, or at least in the Board’s radar so that when that licensee starts legally or illegally getting high and they learn of it they will be ready.   Any issue that brings the medical professional – high on legal Pennsylvania medical pot – to their respective Board’s attention will become the subject of a targeted enforcement scheme to strip their license.

 

Call me to discuss your medical condition, medical needs, and how to proceed.

 

 

 

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Pennsylvania’s DUI Statute and Warrantless Blood Draws On An Unconscious Person

Since Birchfield v. N. Dakota, 136 S.Ct. 2160, 2173, 2185, 195 L. Ed. 2d 560 (2016), the Pennsylvania Supreme court has swiftly moved to invigorate and buttress Pennsylvania civil liberties and motor vehicle drivers’ privacy rights.  On July 19, 2017, in Commonwealth v. Myers, 2017 Pa. LEXIS 1689, 2017 WL 3045867, the Court upheld lower court rulings granting suppression of blood evidence seized from a drunk, unconscious motorist.

The facts are simple. Myers was visibly drunk, operated the motor vehicle, was arrested by one police officer, and taken to the hospital for a blood draw. A second officer arrived at the hospital, did not observe Myers or ask his consent to take his blood before hospital staff administered medication rendering Myers unconscious.  Unable to respond to his commands, the 2nd police officer instructed the nurse to draw Myers’ blood for testing.  The police did not secure a warrant to draw or search drunk, unconscious Myers’ blood.

The Court granted the appeal to consider the lawfulness of a warrantless blood draw conducted upon a motorist who, having been arrested for DUI, had then been rendered unconscious by medical personnel before a police officer provided O’Connell warnings and before the officer requested the motorist’s submission to a chemical test. The Philadelphia Municipal Court, the Court of Common Pleas, and Superior Court all held that a blood draw conducted under these circumstances is impermissible, and that the results of the derivative blood test are accordingly inadmissible at trial. Because the seizure of Myers‘ blood violated Pennsylvania’s implied consent statute, 75 Pa.C.S. § 1547, and because no other circumstances justified the failure to obtain a search warrant, the Court affirmed all of the lower courts’ decisions suppressing the blood evidence.

At the intermediate appellate level, in Commonwealth v. Myers, 2015 PA Super 140, 118 A.3d 1122 (Pa. Super. 2015), the court stated that Subsection 1547(b)(1) “provides a driver under arrest with [a] statutory right of refusal to blood testing.” (quoting 75 Pa.C.S. § 1547(b)(1)).  Because Myers was unconscious at the time that Officer Domenic requested the blood draw, the court observed that Myers “could not claim the statutory protection” of Subsection 1547(b)(1). 

Superior Court also relies upon Missouri v. McNeely,     U.S.    , 133 S.Ct. 1552, 185 L. Ed. 2d 696 (2013), holding that, “because police did not act pursuant to the implied consent law until 4:45 p.m., after Myers had been rendered unconscious by an intervening cause that occurred subsequent to his DUI arrest and transport to the hospital, … McNeely controls here.”  Like the trial court, Superior Court determines the Commonwealth failed to demonstrate the impracticability of obtaining a warrant prior to the blood draw. Therefore, the panel held that the trial court correctly affirmed the Municipal Court’s order granting Myers‘ motion to suppress.

On appeal to the Supreme Court, the Commonwealth argues that the implied consent statute establishes a valid exception to the warrant requirement of the Fourth Amendment to the United States Constitution and Article I, Section 8 of the Pennsylvania Constitution, and that the statutory right to refuse chemical testing does not apply to unconscious arrestees. The Commonwealth’s central premise is that, under 75 Pa.C.S. § 1547(a), “any individual who exercises the privilege of driving in Pennsylvania has consented to a blood draw.” 

Although a conscious individual may refuse to submit to a chemical test, the Commonwealth asserts that “[t]here is no law in Pennsylvania that treats an unconscious defendant as having revoked his already-provided consent.”  The Commonwealth faults the Superior Court for “distinguish[ing] between conscious and unconscious drivers without any analysis.” (emphasis omitted). In the Commonwealth’s view, an arrestee’s state of consciousness matters only to the extent that “[u]nconsciousness . . . prevents the suspect from refusing the blood draw,” but it “does not somehow negate his existing consent.”  The Supreme Court categorically rejects this argument.

A review of the DUI informed consent issue is a good place to start.  Consistent with 75 Pa. C.S.A. §1547(c) the Pennsylvania’s Motor Vehicle code imposes evidentiary admissibility standards for blood tests consensually drawn without a warrant. Pennsylvania’s Motor Vehicle code addressing driving under the influence (“DUI”) of alcohol or controlled substances, 75 Pa. C.S.A. § 3802 (b)(c) & (d) each contain as an essential element of the criminal offense a defendant’s blood alcohol concentration level.

The grading provisions of the Pennsylvania Motor Vehicle code, 75 Pa. C.S.A. §3803(d), as they relate to DUI charges, identify in subsections 1 through 4 that any individual who is under investigation for violating 75 Pa.C.S.A. § 3802, et seq., (accusing an individual of operating a motor vehicle under the influence of drugs or alcohol such that they are incapable of safely driving) and refuses to voluntary submit to a warrant-less blood test, is to receive enhanced criminal sentencing terms of incarceration solely as a result of the refusal to voluntarily submit to the blood draw.

Pennsylvania’s implied consent law requires motorist who drive on our roads to automatically consent to a blood draw if under police investigation for alleged DUI.  75 Pa.C.S. § 1547(b)(2) (prescribing the “duty of the police officer” to inform a DUI arrestee of the consequences of refusal); Pa. Dep’t of Transp., Bureau of Traffic Safety v. O’Connell, 521 Pa. 242, 555 A.2d 873, 877 (Pa. 1989) (“The law has always required that the police must tell the arrestee of the consequences of a refusal to take [a chemical] test so that he can make a knowing and conscious choice.”)  If the operator refuses, no blood draw can take place.  Now after, Birchfield, the motorist can not be criminally penalized for refusing the blood draw.

By operation of the implied consent statute, once a police officer establishes reasonable grounds to suspect that a motorist has committed a DUI offense, that motorist “shall be deemed to have given consent to one or more chemical tests of breath or blood for the purpose of determining the alcoholic content of blood or the presence of a controlled substance.” 75 Pa.C.S. § 1547(a). Notwithstanding this provision, Subsection 1547(b)(1) confers upon all individuals under arrest for DUI an explicit statutory right to refuse chemical testing, the invocation of which triggers specified consequences. See 75 Pa.C.S. § 1547(b)(1) (“If any person placed under arrest for [DUI] is requested to submit to chemical testing and refuses to do so, the testing shall not be conducted”); Eisenhart, 611 A.2d at 683 (“The statute grants an explicit right to a driver who is under arrest for [DUI] to refuse to consent to chemical testing.”).

The Court rules that under this statutory scheme, a motorist placed under arrest for DUI has a critical decision to make. The arrestee may submit to a chemical test and provide the police with evidence that may be used in a subsequent criminal prosecution, or the arrestee may invoke the statutory right to refuse testing, which: (i) results in a mandatory driver’s license suspension under 75 Pa.C.S. § 1547(b)(1); (ii) renders the fact of refusal admissible as evidence in a subsequent DUI prosecution pursuant to 75 Pa.C.S. § 1547(e); and (iii) authorizes heightened criminal penalties under 75 Pa.C.S. § 3804(c) if the arrestee later is convicted of DUI.

Previously, in very certain terms, Pennsylvania’s Supreme Court has held that, in requesting a chemical test, the police officer must inform the arrestee of the consequences of refusal and notify the arrestee that there is no right to consult with an attorney before making a decision. See O’Connell, 555 A.2d at 877-78.12Link to the text of the note “An arrestee is entitled to this information so that his choice to take a [chemical] test can be knowing and conscious.” Id. at 878. The choice belongs to the arrestee, not the police officer.

In determining the validity of a given consent, the Commonwealth bears the burden of establishing that a consent is the product of an essentially free and unconstrained choice — not the result of duress or coercion, express or implied, or a will overborne — under the totality of the circumstances. The standard for measuring the scope of a person’s consent is based on an objective evaluation of what a reasonable person would have understood by the exchange between the officer and the person who gave the consent. Such evaluation includes an objective examination of the maturity, sophistication and mental or emotional state of the defendant. Gauging the scope of a defendant’s consent is an inherent and necessary part of the process of determining, on the totality of the circumstances presented, whether the consent is objectively valid, or instead the product of coercion, deceit, or misrepresentation.  Commonwealth v. Smith, 621 Pa. 218, 77 A.3d 562, 573 (Pa. 2013).

The case of Commonwealth v. Evans, 2016 PA Super 293  (December 20, 2016), is the first major Pennsylvania Appellate Court decision discussing Pennsylvania’s DUI statute, the Implied Consent Law (“O’Connell Warnings”), and the prosecutor’s burden of proof at the suppression hearing.  Evans holds that a defendant does not have to prove they gave consent only based upon the threat of a more severe criminal penalty (jail and further license suspension).  Rather, the statute itself establishes this burden and the Prosecutor must rebut that legal presumption.  Because there is no ability to rebut a presumption of illegitimate consent when threatened with enhanced jail penalties, all motions to suppress must be granted.

Myers takes Evans one step further, finding that “Subsection 1547(b)(1) does not distinguish in any way between conscious and unconscious individuals, but, rather, provides the statutory right of refusal to “any person placed under arrest” for DUI. 75 Pa.C.S. § 1547(b)(1) (emphasis added). By its plain meaning, “any person” necessarily includes an unconscious person. Accordingly, we hold that Myers had an absolute right to refuse chemical testing pursuant to the implied consent statute, that his unconscious state prevented him from making a knowing and conscious choice as to whether to exercise that right, and that the implied consent statute does not authorize a blood test conducted under such circumstances.”

Medical Marijuana and the Physician Practitioner

In Pennsylvania medical marijuana is almost here.  Business licenses have been issued, dispensaries are being built, and physicians are getting approved as “Practitioners”.  Who will be their patients and how will dispensaries attract patients are unanswered questions as of yet.
The new regulations do set forth very specific proscriptions about who can certify a patient, which patients can be certified to receive a medical marijuana card, and the extent to which certifying practitioners are allowed to participate in this new business space.  This blog will discuss some of these issues.
Firstly, only physicians registered and approved by the Department of Health (“DOH”) as “Practitioners” may certify a patient to receive medical marijuana.   To qualify, a Practitioner must have an active, unrestricted medical or osteopathic license in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania issued pursuant to the Medical Practices Act or the Osteopathic Medical Practice Act.  Only the DOH determines if Practitioners are qualified to treat patients with one or more serious medical conditions. These conditioners are not listed in the regulations.
To become a DOH Practitioner pursuant to medical marijuana regulations the physician must take a four hour training course. The training course shall include important responsibilities of Practitioners under the Medical Marijuana Act, general information regarding medical marijuana under federal and state law, the scientific research regarding the risks and benefits of medical marijuana, and recommendations for medical marijuana as it relates to the continuing care of pain management, risk management opiate addiction, palliative care, overdosing on medical marijuana, informed consent, and other areas to be determined by the DOH.  1181.32.  All Practitioners must be familiar and compliant with the Prescription Drug Monitoring Program.  A physician must possess knowledge of best practices regarding medical marijuana dosage based upon a patient’s serious medical condition and the medical professional’s medical training and specialty.  These provisions, while very vague and ambiguous, are extremely extensive.
Once, a physician is approved as a Practitioner (which has not yet happened), what is the process they must follow to issue patient certifications (the medical marijuana card)? The physician patient initial or follow up consultation must be complete, in person, and documented in the patient’s healthcare records contemporaneous to the issuance of a patient certification.  Any medical marijuana certification can only be issued consistent with (AFTER REVIEWING) the patient’s Prescription Drug Monitoring controlled substance use history. That law is found at 35 P. S. 872.1-872.40. A violation of the monitoring law is a Drug Act violation.
These initial evaluations could become the lynch pin of future disciplinary action against rouge physician Practitioners.  Practitioners can not simply meet a patient claiming to suffer from “cancer”  or a “serious” medical condition and issue a patient certification.  The doctor patient consultation must be complete and extensive.  These patients must already have a “serious” medical condition.  Practitioners must secure documentation of such prior to or contemporaneous with the patient certification.  Up to date X-rays, MRI’s, biopsy results, specialist’s reports, prescription drug histories, and/or copies of a complete medical history file should be secured before issuing the patient certification.  The Practitioner who does not initiate a best practices for these initial patient consultations will expose themselves to unhappy patients (who expect their certification at the first consultation) and disciplinary action for practicing below the standard of care and in violation of DOH medical marijuana regulations.
Patient certifications require complete patient identifiers, along with the diagnosis, assumption of continuing care for the patient, and the length of time (not exceeding one year) that the marijuana treatment would be palliative or therapeutic.  1181.27.  The Practitioner must also recommend either a specific dosage or consultation with the dispensary employee to recommend dosage.   Importantly, Practitioners may not receive or provide medical marijuana product samples — suggesting their patients “try this” to “see how it works”.
Patient certifications are easily revoked.  Practitioners SHALL notify the DOH in writing if they know or have reason to know that one of their certified patient has recovered from their “serious” medical condition, the patient has died, or the medical marijuana use would no longer be therapeutic or palliative. 1181.28-29. The regulations allow a Practitioner to withdraw the issuance of a patient certification at any time, without any reason,  upon written to notification to both the patient and DOH. 1181.29.   This will be  interesting in practice how these provisions play out.  Cancelling a certification could generate patient complaints to DOH and subsequent DOH disciplinary action.  Hence, full compliance with all patient contact and documentation requirements to properly answer  a DOH – and possible Medical Board – investigation is paramount and prophylactic.  DOH will be vigilant against any medical Practitioner violating these regulations.
Once a patient receives DOH revocation notification, the same is entered in the electronic tracking system. Any subsequent distribution of medical marijuana to an uncertified patient shall be a violation of the Prescription Drug Monitoring program protocols and, potentially, the criminal laws of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.  Here is where the trouble for Practitioners lie.  Any improper certification will become a violation of the Drug Act, possibly a felony, thereby creating automatic license suspension issues.
Department of Health regulations allow for a Practitioner to be removed from the medical marijuana practitioner registry if a Practitioner’s medical license is inactive, expired, suspended, revoked, limited or otherwise restricted by the Pennsylvania appropriate medical board. 1181.26. Any physician subject to professional disciplinary action is subject to immediate or temporary suspension of their medical marijuana participation.  A physician subject to any professional disciplinary action (Pennsylvania of other state) may be removed for the Practitioner list.  Importantly, these provisions only require the initiation of disciplinary action, not any formal conclusion to a disciplinary action.  This is a huge provision allowing for emergent and possible automatic suspension from the program and medical license problems.   Stay ahead of the investigatory curve; document everything, practice with extreme ethical limitations, assume any patient in your medical practice is not really sick or is an undercover DOH officer recording your every word.
There is an anti-kickback provision in the medical marijuana regulations. 1181.31(a). The only fee for service a practitioner can receive is from an actual or prospective patient consultation.  Practitioners cannot accept, solicit or offer any form of remuneration from anybody associated with the dispensary in any manner. (No baseball tickets, diners, college tuition, cars, lunch, Christmas baskets.)  All fee for services must be properly schedule and posted.  As there is no insurance coverage for these medical services, receipt for payment in cash must provided and properly documented. Accepting credit card payments for these services could expose the Practitioner to federal banking violations. Revenues must be reported to avoid any state or federal tax evasion investigations.  Depositing this cash in the bank is a separate issue for a separate blog.
Practitioners are extremely limited to whom they can issue certifications.    Practitioners can not be a designated caregiver for a their own patient to whom the Practitioner issues a certification, may not issue a patient certification for themselves or a family or non family household member.  Practitioners may not advertise their services as a Practitioner who can certify a patient to receive medical marijuana. 1181.31(b)-(f). Practitioners will require continuing, aggressive management of their qualifications to ensure continued compliance with DOH medical marijuana regulations. A Practitioner under the Act cannot hold a direct or economic interest in a medical marijuana organization.
Any physician removed from the practitioner registry may not have asked electronic access to patient certifications, issue or modify a patient certification, or provide a copy of existing patient certifications to any person parentheses including a patient caregiver, or other medical professional, except in accordance with applicable law.
Call me to discuss setting up your practice or any potential disciplinary issues associated with your practice as a practitioner certifying patients to receive medical marijuana.

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A Harsh Disciplinary Enforcement Environment for Pennsylvania Licensees

I write this blog in preparation for a Pennsylvania Nursing Board ordered Mental and Physical Examination (“MPE”) of a client.   It is startling the number of these board ordered evaluations or PHMP/PHP/PNAP assessments due to some type of licensee criminal conduct.  The heightened disciplinary activity among all boards reveals a much stricter atmosphere of licensee disciplinary enforcement.  Why?
Pennsylvania’s heightened disciplinary environment is based upon a single legislative occurrence and a single judicial decision.  Legislatively, passage of Pennsylvania’s medical marijuana regulatory scheme has prompted a review of all licensing laws in anticipation of increased licensee impairment and criminal activity due to marijuana usage (legal or not).
A prime example of this is Senate Bill 354 of 2017.  I wrote about this bill last week.  This bill seeks to compel any licensee charged with a crime (not convicted) to report such to their respective licensing board within 30 days of arrest.  Failure to report will constitute a separate basis for discipline.  This Bill seeks to bring the boards’ immediate knowledge of licensee’s criminal conduct so discipline can commence sooner.
Pennsylvania’s licensing boards subscribe to JNET – Pennsylvania’ criminal fingerprint data base.  The Boards already know of licensee’s criminal charges of which they already expect them to report upon conviction.  However, the Boards now want quicker reporting, with an additional and stronger basis for discipline.  False reporting and failing to report criminal conduct!!
But this bill is not not law.  So what’s the juice?  The juice is that current licensee’s facing disciplinary action for some really minor issues will think twice before smoking pot; they will tell their friends and co-workers to think twice before smoking pot and taking care of the public.  The health related boards are gearing up prosecutors for stricter supervision of all licensees.  In this conservative jurisdiction, pot is thought to be a gateway drug to heroin.  The prescription based opiate epidemic caught the health related boards with their pants down.  It will not happen again with the passage of medical marijuana.
The enforcement environment also extends to potential licensees enrolled in any health related school who apply for licensure with a criminal history of one or two DUI’s.  I represent many individuals whose licensure applications have been stalled based upon conditional denials and compelled PHMP enrollment.   A new regulation requiring  license applicants to be licensed within 12 months of taking their board examinations aides the Board in weeding out potential applicants who do not accept PHMP enrollment.
DO NOT go willy-nilly to the PHP/PHMP assessment and or evaluation with the expectation that you will pass and be given your license.  DO NOT answer the personal data sheet with out consulting an attorney.  DO NOT talk to the PHMP intake or assessors without attorney preparation.  They write everything down — your story of depression, injured or dead family members, your divorce, your child abuse history.  The PHMP people will always recommend enrollment in the VRP after you, the new licensee, admit your mental health treatment, drug use, and inability to practice safely.   How can you admit you can not practice safely if you have never practiced?  Applicants fighting their cases must be patient and call me ASAP. 
The Birchfield decision (written about in other blogs) is the judicial decision most affecting disciplinary actions.  Birchfield focused on the admissibility of blood alcohol levels as a result of a non-consensual blood draw in a DUI investigation. This case has rippled through every Pennsylvania county’s drunk driving enforcement efforts.  Birchfield ruled inadmissible DUI blood evidence that revealed drugs (illegal or prescription) and/or marijuana use.
Birchfield rendered blood drug use evidence an inappropriate basis for licensee disciplinary action.  The heightened reporting responsibilities of nurses (30 days from arrest), allow petitions for mental and physical evaluations based upon affidavits of probable cause reflecting alcohol or drug use even though blood evidence is not admissible in a court of law.  The Boards want to know right away what its licensees are smoking or drugs they are ingesting.
Pennsylvania licensees need to fight every criminal case. The new notice provisions in Bill 354 will become law.  While criminal charges are pending licensees will have to provide a potentially incriminating personal statement to a licensing board.  This is crazy.  There is no 5th Amendment right against self-incrimination in a professional license defense.  Licensees need an attorney to help draft counseled answers to strategic legal questions and statements under these circumstances.  Now, more than any time in the recent past, licensees should utilize counsel to properly protect their license.
The Boards use their experts to determine impairment.  Why shouldn’t you use your expert to protect your license?  Licensees face workplace challenges, complex life issues, and now a crazy enforcement environment in Pennsylvania.    Mail from the PHMP, PHP, and PNAP present multi- faceted traps for even the most experienced licensees.  Licensee need their own expert — an experienced criminal and administrative law attorney to effectively protect their license.  Call me to discuss your criminal or license case.

Pennsylvania’s Medical Marijuanna Law and the Medical Licensee

Medical marijuana is close to reality in Pennsylvania. However, a reality check is necessary at this time. Do not be mistaken and think that as a licensed professional you are not subject to losing your job or license if you test positive for legalized THC in your blood while on the job.

This blog will discuss various provisions of Pennsylvania’s new medical marijuana law and it’s enforcement on Pennsylvania licensed professionals. This blog will not discuss violations of the Medical Marijuana Act by licensed practitioners and patients.

Pennsylvania’s MEDICAL MARIJUANA ACT is found at 2015 Bill Text PA S.B. 3, 2015 Bill Text PA S.B. 3.  The main provision of the Act as it pertains to use of marijuana by a licensee is § 510, (4).  The clause states that:   “A PATIENT MAY BE PROHIBITED BY AN EMPLOYER FROM PERFORMING ANY DUTY WHICH COULD RESULT IN A PUBLIC HEALTH OR SAFETY RISK WHILE UNDER THE INFLUENCE OF MEDICAL MARIJUANA. THE PROHIBITION SHALL NOT BE DEEMED AN ADVERSE EMPLOYMENT DECISION EVEN IF THE PROHIBITION RESULTS IN FINANCIAL HARM FOR THE PATIENT.

This provision does not have THC blood level nano gram cut off for the amount of medical marijuana in patient/professional’s blood.  The language “Under the Influence” is repeatedly used.  Every drug/alcohol expert (not PHMP assessor) knows that a “Under the Influence” blood level is different for every person. This means any active medical marijuana patient/user who is a professional licensee is still subject licensing board prosecution and employment related disciplinary action for allegedly practicing “Under the Influence” of THC in violation of their licensing regulatory statute, regardless of what this provision provides.

Experts of what THC levels constitute “Under the Influence” mean will now abound.  Employment based random drug tests based upon appearances of “Under the Influence” will become rampant.  Each such positive drug test, with drug expert conclusions on what is “Under the Influence of THC” will become a reportable action to the professional board, which can still take action against the licensee.  This is especially true for the licensee who does not possess a medical marijuana patient card and tests positive for THC.  This conduct will still result in Board prosecution because marijuana use without a registration card is still illegal regardless of whether criminally charged or when THC is removed from Pennsylvania’s controlled substance schedules.

There are two provisions of the Act that support this interpretation. The first is § 1101.  This section states GRAPP governs enforcement of the Act. Grapp is Pennsylvania’s General Rules for Administrative Practice and Procedure. These  are the same procedural and substantive rules that apply to professional license prosecutions. As such, the same hearing officers that are familiar with how to and which disciplinary provisions apply to the licensed professional accused of violating their licensing regulations will review allegations of Medical Marijuana Act violations for either THC issues or violative conduct under the Act as a health care provider.

The next section is § 2103.  This provision deals with protections to licensees who are otherwise medical marijuana card carriers. However, the protections set forth herein only apply to proper use and application of the medical marijuana card.  Licensees accused of sharing their medical marijuana to a non-medical marijuana patient, or who engage in other criminal violations (DUI or a Drug Act violation) are still subject to disciplinary action under their own licensing regulations.

As well, subsection § 2103(B)(2) still allows for employment related disciplinary action for those professional’s medical marijuana use that places the public in harm’s way. If you are reading this blog, you are my typical medical professional client. You cannot got to work “Under the Influence” of THC even if it is a prescribed medication.  Even though working with THC in your blood is allowed and can not form the “sole” basis for disciplinary action, working in a negligent or reckless manner due to being “Under the influence” automatically puts patients at risk.  This conduct will become the basis for employment and licensing action. How and why such becomes known to supervisors is anyone’s guess.

The provision addressing this reality is § 1309.  Section 1309 does not prevent imposition any civil or criminal penalty for undertaking a task “Under the Influence” of medical marijuana when doing so would constitute negligence, professional malpractice or professional misconduct.  Further, if you are not a registered medical marijuana patient, § 2101, making primacy the Medical Marijuana Act over the Drug Act, does not protect you, the illegal possessor or distributor (sharing) of marijuana.

Finally, it cannot be overstated the potential affect on a professional’s license the suggestion of a medical disability warranting medical marijuana use.  Being a properly registered medical marijuana patient legally allows one to consume medical marijuana.  However, requesting your medical professional to verify under the Act’s procedures that you so suffer from a medical condition that medical marijuana is the primary medication may trigger Petitions for Mental and Physical Evaluation by your licensing board.

This would occur when a failed employment related drug test or occurrence is reported to the Board.  The obvious and typical “Under the Influence” allegations would be made.  While no specific direct disciplinary action could be the first salvo in a disciplinary prosecution, allegations of medical infirmity that creates a professional impairment will be lodged.  The Mental and Physical Evaluation that will follow will necessarily require production of all medical records, even those that form the basis for the medical marijuana card.  This raises the specter of a PHMP required monitoring program for which marijuana use is strictly prohibited.  Please read my other blogs on the PHMP and the 3-5 religious based abstinence program.

In sum medical marijuana is more of an indirectly but just as serious threat to many licensees who could become trapped in the maze of license prosecutions once blood tests are drawn and “Under the Influence” allegations are made.  Call me to discuss.

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